Nylabone Issues Limited Recall of Puppy Starter Kit

April 30, 2015

Neptune City, NJ – Nylabone is proud of our well-earned reputation for safety, quality and excellence in our products since our first dog toy was manufactured in 1955. As pet parents ourselves, we at Nylabone have the safety and well-being of our customers’ dogs first and foremost in our minds with every single product we make. It was during one of our many quality control tests that we identified a small lot of Puppy Starter Kits with a dog chew that tested positive for salmonella.

The positive test was from one single lot (LT 21935), a small number of less than 3000 pieces of Nylabone Puppy Starter Kits made in our facilities in Neptune City, New Jersey. No other Nylabone products were affected. Should you have a Puppy Starter Kit with that lot number and have questions, please call our consumer hotline below, and please be sure to return the product to the address at the bottom of this page for a full refund or replacement.

We have been working with the few customers who received this batch of product to return the pieces. We regret this incident and thank you for your continued confidence in Nylabone dog toys and chews.

What are the product details?
Item number:    N201PSKP
UPC:      0-18214-81291-3
Lot number:       LT21935
NO OTHER LOTS OR PRODUCT LINES ARE AFFECTED

Who should I contact?
Return product to:
Nylabone Puppy Starter Kit Recall
c/o Central Life Sciences
1501 E. Woodfield Rd., Suite 200W
Schaumburg, IL 60173

For more information, contact Nylabone Consumer Care:
Email: info@nylabone.com
Phone: (855) 273-7527

 

Source: http://www.nylabone.com/about/company-news/nylabone-issues-limited.htm

April 27, 2015

 

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Importance of Your New Puppy or Kitten’s First Exam

March 26, 2015

Golden Retriever puppy and ginger kitten

Congratulations on your new puppy or kitten! I’m sure you’ve stocked up on supplies such as treats, toys, food dishes, and beds, but have you had your new family member checked by a veterinarian yet? It is important that you have your pet examined so that he or she may be evaluated for infectious and inherited diseases, as well as to begin his or her preventative health care routine, including vaccines.

You will be asked to bring a fresh stool sample to your pet’s first visit so that we can check for parasites. It is not uncommon for new puppies and kittens to have intestinal parasites (some of which can be transmitted to people) and external parasites, such as fleas and ear mites.

We will perform a thorough nose to tail exam to check your new pal for infectious diseases, such as respiratory infections, and inherited problems, such as hernias, heart murmurs, and open fontanelles (soft spot in the skull).

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We start core puppy and kitten vaccines between 6-8 weeks of age and continue every 3 weeks until they are about 16 weeks old. Puppies and kittens receive some antibodies from their mom’s milk, and these levels start to drop around 6-8 weeks old. The importance of starting vaccines at this age is that we are helping their bodies create their own protective antibodies as the ones they got from mom start to wane. We will also discuss optional vaccines that may be recommended for your pet based on his or her lifestyle, such as Lyme and Leptosporosis.

Another part of preventative care is to begin flea, tick, heartworm, and internal parasite preventatives. We have oral and topical options that we can discuss with you.

Lastly, your consultation with the veterinarian is your opportunity to ask any questions you may have about your new pet. We will discuss crate and litterbox training, basic behavior concerns, safe chew toys, proper diet and exercise, and dental care. You are free to ask any additional questions you may have– this is your opportunity to learn about caring for your new family member and we want to start you off on the right foot!

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Get to Know the Owner of Companion Pet Hospital of Fishkill, Dr. Hope Jankunas!

March 10, 2015

As a child Hope Jankunas cared for her family’s pet cats.

She took the lead when the cats were brought to the veterinarian, speaking directly with the doctor about whatever ailed them. She also befriended stray cats and dogs, and as a high school teen in Elmont, Nassau County, volunteered at a local animal hospital, cleaning kennel cages.

“I’ve always been in love with animals,” said Jankunas, veterinarian practice owner of Companion Pet Hospital of Fishkill.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 70,300 veterinarians are employed in the country with the figure expected to hit 78,700 in 2022 from increasing interest in pet care and advancements in available service

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After earning a bachelor’s degree in biology and environmental studies at Boston College, Jankunas went to work as a veterinarian technician in Bayside, Queens County. To work as a vet, however, she needed to continue her education. She moved to Florida with the intent of becoming a resident there before applying to her school of choice, the University of Florida, College of Veterinary Medicine, and began working at the school as a veterinarian technician, working with large and small animals in the surgery department while taking pre-requisite classes for anticipated coursework.

“Basically, I was working on my application to vet school, getting experience with large animals and continuing my experience with small animals,” she said.

Two years later, Jankunas was admitted to the school, whereupon she moved into clinical pathology at work, since the hours spent processing lab samples were a better fit for her class schedule. After graduating, she did a one-year residency at the Animal Medical Center in New York City then worked for about three years as one of five veterinarians at the Center for Veterinary Care in Manhattan.

“It was great being a vet and having the mentorship for a couple of years but, ultimately, I wanted to be my own boss,” she said.

She moved to the Middlehope Veterinary Hospital in Newburgh, Orange County, a position that put her near her boyfriend (now husband), Jeremy Frederick, an equine veterinary medical specialist in Millbrook.

“I still wanted to make new protocols,” Jankunas said of her work. “I worked on establishing different ways of doing things. They were open to my suggestion and they put some ideas in practice but not everything.”

Three years later she learned the owners of the Companion Pet Hospital in Fishkill were nearing retirement, with Jankunas buying the practice in December 2014. Now she’d like to establish relationships with local animal welfare and rescue groups.

“When I arrived at my vet school it was 80 percent women,” Jankunas said. “But there are not 80 percent of vet practices that are owned by women.”

Frederick said his wife has worked hard to realize her dream of owning a vet practice and is passionate about providing a high standard of services and care.

“She’s always been one of those people that wants to do things the best way she can,” he said.

Karen Maserjian Shan is a freelance writer: mkshan@optonline.net

Young Professional profile

Hope Jankunas

Age: 35

Title: Veterinarian practice owner, Companion Pet Hospital of Fishkill

Education: Bachelor’s degree in biology and environmental studies, Boston College; veterinary degree, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine

Professional affiliations: American Veterinary Medical Association, New York State Veterinary Medical Society, American Animal Hospital Association, American Association of Feline Practitioners, provisional member of the Junior League of Poughkeepsie

Residence: Hopewell Junction

Information:www.companionpethospital.com/

 

Source: http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/story/money/2015/03/06/vet-realizes-dream-owning-pet-hospital/24500069/

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Protect Your Pet During Winter and Cold Weather

January 8, 2015

iStock_000022827275_Medium

Keep pets indoors and warm

The best prescription for winter’s woes is to keep your dog or cat inside with you and your family. The happiest dogs are those who are taken out frequently for walks and exercise but kept inside the rest of the time.

 

Don’t leave pets outdoors when the temperature drops.

During walks, short-haired dogs may feel more comfortable wearing a sweater. No matter what the temperature is, windchill can threaten a pet’s life. Pets are sensitive to severe cold and are at risk for frostbite and hypothermia during extreme cold snaps. Exposed skin on noses, ears and paw pads can quickly freeze and suffer permanent damage.

 

Take precautions if your pet spends a lot of time outside

A dog or cat is happiest and healthiest when kept indoors. If for some reason your dog is outdoors much of the day, he or she must be protected by a dry, draft-free shelter that is large enough to allow the dog to sit and lie down comfortably but small enough to hold in his/her body heat. The floor should be raised a few inches off the ground and covered with cedar shavings or straw. The doorway should be covered with waterproof burlap or heavy plastic.

 

Help neighborhood outdoor cats

If there are outdoor cats, either owned pets or community cats (ferals, who are scared of people, and strays, who are lost or abandoned pets) in your area, remember that they need protection from the elements as well as food and water. It’s easy to give them a hand.

 

Give your pets plenty of food and water

Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy. Routinely check your pet’s water dish to make certain the water is fresh and unfrozen. Use plastic food and water bowls; when the temperature is low, your pet’s tongue can stick and freeze to metal.

First walk in the snow

Be careful with cats, wildlife and cars

Warm engines in parked cars attract cats and small wildlife, who may crawl up under the hood. To avoid injuring any hidden animals, bang on your car’s hood to scare them away before starting your engine.

 

Protect paws from salt

The salt and other chemicals used to melt snow and ice can irritate the pads of your pet’s feet. Wipe all paws with a damp towel before your pet licks them and irritates his/her mouth.

 

Avoid antifreeze poisoning

Antifreeze is a deadly poison, but it has a sweet taste that may attract animals and children. Wipe up spills and keep antifreeze (and all household chemicals) out of reach. Coolants and antifreeze made with propylene glycol are less toxic to pets, wildlife and family.

 

Speak out if you see a pet left in the cold

If you encounter a pet left in the cold, document what you see: the date, time, exact location and type of animal, plus as many details as possible. Video and photographic documentation (even a cell phone photo) will help bolster your case. Then contact your local animal control agency or county sheriff’s office and present your evidence. Take detailed notes regarding whom you speak with and when. Respectfully follow up in a few days if the situation has not been remedied.

 

Horse owners: provide special care to your outdoor pets

Give your horses shelter and dry warmth Be sure your horses have access to a barn or a three-sided run-in so they can escape the wind and cold. While not all horses will need to be blanketed, blankets will help horses keep warm and dry, especially if there is any rain or snow. If you’ve body-clipped your horses, keep them blanketed throughout the winter. Supply food and water to your horses around the clock Give your horses access to unfrozen water at all times. You can use heated buckets or water heaters/deicers to make sure the water doesn’t freeze. Feed your horses more forage—unlimited amounts, if possible—during extreme cold. This will help your horses create heat and regulate their body temperatures.

 

SOURCE: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/protect_pets_winter.html

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Holiday Safety Tips for Pets

December 11, 2014

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

Little cat playing with Christmas tree ornaments

O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

 

Tinsel-less Town
Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

 

No Feasting for the Furries
By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

 

Toy Joy
Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.

  • Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines. Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.
  • Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

 

Forget the Mistletoe & Holly

Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested.

Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Leave the Leftovers 

Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.

 

That Holiday Glow
Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

German Shorthaired Pointer Christmas edition

Wired Up 
Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth.

 

House Rules
If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.

Put the Meds Away 

Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

Careful with Cocktails
If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

A Room of Their Own 
Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.

New Year’s Noise
As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears.

 

Source: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/holiday-safety-tips

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Thanksgiving Pet Safety Tips

November 20, 2014

What a tasty fish!

‘Tis the season for friends, family and holiday feasts—but also for possible distress for our animal companions. Pets won’t be so thankful if they munch on undercooked turkey or a pet-unfriendly floral arrangement, or if they stumble upon an unattended alcoholic drink. Check out the following tips from ASPCA experts for a fulfilling Thanksgiving that your pets can enjoy, too.

Talkin’ Turkey

If you decide to feed your pet a little nibble of turkey, make sure it’s boneless and well-cooked. Don’t offer her raw or undercooked turkey, which may contain salmonella bacteria.

Sage Advice

Sage can make your Thanksgiving stuffing taste delish, but it and many other herbs contain essential oils and resins that can cause gastrointestinal upset and central nervous system depression to pets if eaten in large quantities. Cats are especially sensitive to the effects of certain essential oils.

No Bread Dough

Don’t spoil your pet’s holiday by giving him raw bread dough. According to ASPCA experts, when raw bread dough is ingested, an animal’s body heat causes the dough to rise in his stomach. As it expands, the pet may experience vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating, which could become a life-threatening emergency, requiring surgery.

Don’t Let Them Eat Cake

If you’re baking up Thanksgiving cakes, be sure your pets keep their noses out of the batter, especially if it includes raw eggs—they could contain salmonella bacteria that may lead to food poisoning.

Too Much of a Good Thing

A few small boneless pieces of cooked turkey, a taste of mashed potato or even a lick of pumpkin pie shouldn’t pose a problem. However, don’t allow your pets to overindulge, as they could wind up with a case of stomach upset, diarrhea or even worse—an inflammatory condition of the pancreas known as pancreatitis. In fact, it’s best keep pets on their regular diets during the holidays.

A Feast Fit for a Kong

While the humans are chowing down, give your cat and dog their own little feast. Offer them Nylabones or made-for-pet chew bones. Or stuff their usual dinner—perhaps with a few added tidbits of turkey, vegetables (try sweet potato or green beans) and dribbles of gravy—inside a Kong toy. They’ll be happily occupied for awhile, working hard to extract their dinner from the toy.

 

SOURCE: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/thanksgiving-safety-tips

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Why Dogs Bark and Growl

September 16, 2014

Does your dog growl or bark when a stranger approaches your house or when something goes bump in the night? If so, you’re not alone.

Most dogs will vocalize when they are exposed to new or different situations, including strange people or animals entering their territory; being separated from their pack, mother or even your family members; or new or alarming sounds. Dogs may also bark or growl when they see prey, such as squirrels, and they may bark for attention, food or if they are anxious. Dogs often growl when they are fearful or trying to assert themselves in a situation. If the dog’s fear or assertiveness is alleviated by growling or barking, the dog will learn that his behavior is acceptable and the behavior may become more frequent or severe. Some medical problems may cause growling or barking and older pets experiencing senile changes may have barking problems. Intense and continuous barking may be considered compulsive. Check with your veterinarian to evaluate your pet’s barking or growling problem. Behavior training and drug therapy may be helpful in reducing barking for pets with medical, geriatric and compulsive disorders.

 Socializing your puppy can help
Acclimate your puppy to a variety of different people, environments, situations and noises to help lessen anxiety as your puppy grows. Make sure your puppy spends time alone so that he doesn’t develop separation anxiety while you are away from him. Proper training is essential to preventing behavior problems, such as growling and barking. Ask you veterinarian for more information about puppy training.

Correcting a barking or growling problem 
Correcting a barking or growling problem first requires that you have effective management of your dog. Once you have achieved this, you can begin to train your dog to lessen his barking or growling behavior by using rewards for quiet behavior. The reward should be something that the dog really likes such as a favorite treat, tummy rubs, or a favorite toy. Punishment is generally ineffective in correcting barking problems. Too much punishment may even exacerbate the behavior and cause the dog to be fearful or aggressive.

Begin your training with situations that you can easily control (such as a family member making a noise that causes the dog to bark) before moving on to difficult situations (such as a strange animal in your yard). When your dog barks at the stimuli (for instance, a doorbell ring), immediately interrupt the barking. When the dog is quiet offer the dog a reward for their behavior. Without the reward there is no incentive to remain quiet.Reward your dog when, at your request, he has stopped barking. Only reward the dog when he is quiet and gradually increase the amount of time that the dog needs to be quiet for him to receive a reward.

As the barking or growling problem decreases, make sure to direct your dog to more appropriate behavior, such as play, and the problem should lessen over time. Don’t forget to discuss training options with your veterinarian to find the one that will work best for your pet.

 Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/dog_care/behavior/barking_and_growling.aspx

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Back to School Separation Anxiety

August 19, 2014

With all the excitement of the kids going back to school, many families may not think about what it means to the dog or cat. What you may notice are changes in behavior, a sad dog or cat, who mopes around or sleeps a lot more. Or your dog may suddenly started chewing things he shouldn’t, or your cat does a lot more meowing. And you may not even connect the unusual cat or dog behavior with back-to-school time. Dogs and cats love routine, it makes them feel secure. They like knowing that certain things happen at about the same time each day, and they know where they want to be when it happens. If the kids have been around all summer, playing outside with the dog, or giving kitty extra love and snuggles, and suddenly they’re gone all day, it’s upsetting. For some pets, they just feel sad and confused, and others feel real separation anxiety and may act up.

Kids can help your pet through the back-to-school blues The first thing to note is that this is a family matter, and a good opportunity for the kids to take more responsibility for the care of their pets. Let your kids know that their dog or cat is going to miss them when they’re gone all day, and discuss what they can do to help their pets through it. One of the best ways for a pet to get over the loss of one routine is to replace it with another. Your pet may be sad all day at first, but if he knows that at 3:45 your kids will be home from school and will actively play with him soon after each day, your pet has something new to look forward to. If your child has a set time to do homework or read, that’s an excellent time for the dog or cat to curl up next to her and “help” with studying. Ask your kids to think of other ways to include their pets in their routines.

More than just sad, it’s separation anxiety If your pet exhibits true separation anxiety, as in, he goes crazy when he sees your kids put on their backpacks to leave for school, or is destructive when everyone is gone, you’ll have to do some gentle training to ease his stress. Your kids may feel sorry for their pet and do a long sad goodbye. This only reinforces your pet’s fears and builds up the anxiety. It’s better to make the goodbye upbeat and brief, or eliminate it completely. Depending on your pet, he may respond well to a goodbye petting, a little goodbye treat, or simply leaving with a cheerful “good boy!” as your kids go out the door. This should happen before your pet gets upset. If your pet is freaking out, absolutely do not reward with anything. If you can’t get your pet to calm down if it’s a dog, a simple “sit!” command may help. Then reward with petting and telling him he’s ok once he’s calm. If your pet gets upset just by the backpacks or car keys being picked up, pick those items up and walk around the house with them several times a day, but don’t leave. Your pet will learn not to associate those items with the pending doom of your kids leaving.

 

When back-to-school means an empty house If everyone is gone all day, both parents included, your pets are going to be bored on top of being upset. It’s important to leave them some interactive toys to help them pass the time. Eventually, they will get used to the new reality, and will likely sleep most of the day. You can balance the boredom by providing vigorous exercise each day when you or your kids are home. Remember, you and your kids may have had a very busy day, but your pet has done virtually nothing, unless there is evidence to the contrary, as in a shredded or chewed up sofa. Providing your dog or cat active, vigorous play each day will help them burn up their pent up energy. Take your dog for a run or go outside and throw a ball or flying disk. For your cat, run around the house with a little toy on the end of a string. You may also want to consider getting your pet a little buddy to keep him company when no one is home. Even an aloof adult cat is likely to accept a kitten into her life, and the kitten will entice the older cat to play. And dogs, being true social animals, nearly always accept another dog to play with. Remember, your pets can get nervous, upset, anxious or lonely just like people, only they don’t have the benefit of knowing that you’ll be back when you leave. It’s up to you and your kids to make your pets feel secure in ways they understand.

 

Source: http://www.petcentric.com/08-24-2009/your-pets-view-of-kids-going-back-to-school

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AAHA Accreditation

July 24, 2014

Unlike human hospitals, animal hospitals are not required to be accredited. Veterinary hospitals are evaluated on approximately 900 standards of veterinary excellence in order to become accredited. AAHA-accredited hospitals are recognized among the finest in the industry, and are consistently at the forefront of advanced veterinary medicine. Their Standards of Accreditation are continuously reviewed and updated to keep accredited practices on the cutting edge of veterinary excellence. Their standards address patient care and pain management, surgery, pharmacy, laboratory, exam facilities, medical records, cleanliness, emergency services, dental care, diagnostic imaging, anesthesiology, and continuing education. To maintain accredited status, we undergo comprehensive on-site evaluations every three years.

What does accreditation mean? It means that we hold ourselves to a higher standard, and that your pet is receiving care at a hospital that has passed the highest standards in veterinary care.

We are very proud to offer the best veterinary care for your pet and hope that you are proud to say that you take your pet to an AAHA accredited animal hospital!

Still have questions about what AAHA means for you and your pet? Leave a comment below!

Source: http://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/about_aaha/why_accreditation_matters/about_accreditation/default.aspx

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Hot Weather Tips to Help Your Pet Stay Cool This Summer

June 17, 2014

Summer means enjoying the weather, and for most, with your pet! Remember to keep your pet healthy this summer by keeping them safe in the summer’s high temperatures.

Here are just some of the ways you can help ensure your pets have a safe summer:

Visit the Vet. A visit to the veterinarian for a spring or early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on all necessary vaccinations. Pets should also be given a blood test for heartworm every year in the early spring. The deadly parasite is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito, and it is recommended that dogs and cats be on a monthly preventive medication year-round.

Keep Cool. Dogs and cats can become dehydrated quickly, so give your pets plenty of water when it is hot outdoors. Also make sure your pet has a shady place to escape the sun, and when the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt.

Know the Symptoms. Some symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, seizures, and an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Summertime is the perfect time for a backyard barbeque or party, but remember to keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression, comas, or even death. Similarly, remember that the snacks you serve your friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments.” Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.

Water Safety is Pet-friendly. Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool, as not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure pets wear flotation devices while on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.

Source: http://www.aspca.org/about-us/press-releases/aspca-offers-hot-weather-safety-tips-help-pets-beat-heat-during-dog-and-cat

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